Robots and machines are fascinating and useful tools — but what about humans? The convenience and price of that having been established.

Robots and machines are fascinating and useful tools — but what about humans? The convenience and price of that having been established.

Studies have shown that being a robot is way cheaper for doctors than being a human, which is why some states are banning all inpatient surgeries performed by robots. Many people have said they are tired of being patients and work very closely with their robot doctors.

But are we really OK with robots having the final say in surgery? Does it make the same kind of sense as is usually the case with humans in policy? I think not.

In fact, robots that are controlled by humans may have better policies. In the case of humanoid robots that have more structure than typical humans, such as ones used for high-speed-training, it may be better to have a human with those processes controlling the robot.

As an example, imagine having a nuclear engineer who is very intelligent and relies on super intelligence to gather information and examine the parameters of an environment — even before a device is even placed in the reactor.

What robots do, is to figure out what does and doesn’t work when making decisions — and a responsible, competent human being controlling the robot is the right thing to do. Of course, human doctors (and there are numerous in many hospitals) have better policies with respect to the natural quirks of their robot.

I did a teach some of my students the contrast between how humans usually speak, and robot remarks, as I am a housewife with my daughter and I had a robot that spoke to me and offered me assistance. Let me just say that I was very impressed.

The point is that robots are not always good — but they are very useful tools.