As the Trump administration ramps up efforts to expand access to health care for every American, President Donald Trump on Wednesday said his administration will work to dramatically expand access to CVID-19, a state-of-the-art vaccine for girls and women in developing countries. (Reuters)

As the Trump administration ramps up efforts to expand access to health care for every American, President Donald Trump on Wednesday said his administration will work to dramatically expand access to CVID-19, a state-of-the-art vaccine for girls and women in developing countries. “Make sure every American has the greatest chance of success, regardless of race, religion, or sex. Our goal is to make CVID-19 available to every girl in America by April 2021,” Trump said during a speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “In the meantime, we are working to make CVID-19 available to any American now able to get it, regardless of their physical, sexual, or gender characteristics,” the president said. CVID-19, a vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), combines effective adjuvants and is aimed at preventing infection between healthy young adults and adolescents, the administration said. “Other countries and developing countries are using this vaccine to protect against the HPV virus in young women at a much earlier stage in their lives,” the White House said in a statement.

The US Ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, led a team at the forum to identify where the US can invest in getting CVID-19 to Americans, and all of the leaders from the UN and other global institutions said they were committed to supporting the system. “Now that the standard adjuvant is available, we believe CVID-19 will have the added benefit of protecting tens of millions of adolescents and young women in under-served countries,” Haley said. “The administration is also committed to supporting women and girls in lower-income countries as we work to mobilize funding to provide needed vaccines,” the White House said. It noted that the current adaption of CVID-19 in partnership with partners like WHO, Merck, Bayer and others is considered a success.

On the sidelines of the forum, the US invited emerging nations to invest in developing vaccines and immunisation programs that provide tools that help women, children and families and improve national health care. “We will work with our partners to ensure the continued application of CVID-19 in emerging and lower-income countries, where childhood immunisation rates, especially for children, are low and women and girls are key to the economic well-being of developing countries,” the White House said. The US has committed to spending $2.9 billion on vaccines for children and pregnant women from 2010 to 2020, and of that amount, $785 million will be used to assist nations like India that are implementing CVID-19.