The video-streaming service stresses its “power balance” approach to motivating staff and says it takes “behavioural fairness” seriously. (Reuters)

Netflix employees living in multiple cities should be offered holidays and shorter commutes in addition to their job responsibilities to encourage good behaviour, the company’s chief executive has said, though some workers complain about lack of family and personal time.

Announcing a raft of changes in what it says is a “transparent, empowered workplace,” CEO Reed Hastings said some staff members were doing well while others weren’t, but that there were also individuals who enjoyed the company but didn’t need the time off, according to an interview with the Financial Times to be published today.

“It’s about balance. We want some employees to like it and work there and others who just need time,” Hastings said. “It’s in fact a question of the power balance. People have interests and responsibilities, and so if they feel good about that, they will be more productive at Netflix. But if there’s zero enthusiasm, that doesn’t work, and nobody else will work there.”

The Netflix workers living in multiple cities should be offered holidays and shorter commutes in addition to their job responsibilities to encourage good behaviour, he said. Employees are encouraged to take a reward for doing good work, with an aim to create incentives for employees to get the maximum, rewarding them for good behaviour.

Netflix also makes incentives against complaints about work quality, such as reducing programming in phases, by offering employees incentives to get up at 3am to watch a recording at a computer away from the office, Hastings said.

The video-streaming service stresses its “power balance” approach to motivating staff and says it takes “behavioural fairness” seriously.

But some workers are worried that the company is encouraging employees to overwork and don’t reward good behaviour, according to the FT report. The changes were announced over the summer and were prompted by complaints from independent employees, the paper said.

“It’s clear that the company has taken a deep breath and looks at all the feedback we’ve heard from our long-serving employees,” in the same interview, the company said. “To be clear, we do not condone or condone unreasonable work hours.”

Netflix declined to comment.